Annex 105: Sprinkles (Boston Day 1) | Mr. Lew's Great Burger Search

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In 2013, I had the chance to venture outside of Montreal more than once.  In April, I had the wonderful chance to visit the states of New Jersey and New York for the very first time.  Now, at the end of the month of May, the city of Boston and its surrounding area were next on the radar.

I make it no secret that I am a high school teacher.  This year, I actually used that to my advantage when posting new content on this site.  When I heard that my school was planning a trip to Boston, I made sure that I was one of the adults accompanying the students to that city.  Despite how I feel about the city, it was an opportunity that I wasn’t going to pass up.

The trip was going to last two days in all, with the majority of the time being spent on the road, since Boston is at least 6-7 hours away by bus.  Our departure time was on May 23 at an early 7 a.m.  For most of the 40 students being accompanied on this trip, this time was foreign.  At this time, we were introduced to the bus driver and guide who were the unlucky souls who would have to put up with us for the next 41 hours.

A bus trip isn’t fun, but one must find entertainment for such a venture.  While the students were busy watching movies like The Hobbit and 17 Again, I decided that catching up on the season premiere of Masterchef was more important.  I also used this time to watch a few episodes of a new show called Burger Land with George Motz, who happens to be the burger guru of the United States.

Our first stop to have lunch was in Littleton, New Hampshire.  Normally, I would seek out a fitting place to feature, but there was literally nothing outside fast food options.  There was this place across the street from where we stopped, but it didn’t look open.  Plus, I wasn’t about to dodge speeding cars.  So, I dined at Subways while others went towards a Burger King and a 5 dollar buffet lunch at Pizza Hut.

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After over 7 hours on the road, we finally arrived in Charlestown, Massachusetts.  The anchor is symbolic, in a way, because we now have landed in a new place.  For a lot of us, just the chance to walk around was a nice change, though waking up the sleeping students wasn’t fun.

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The first stop on our trip was at the U.S.S. Constitution Museum.  While the museum itself wasn’t so notable to write about, the security process was more noteworthy.  This museum is still a military installation, so security measures were taken to make sure everyone was safe.  It was probably the highlight of my trip when I was asked to remove my belt, leaving me to hold up my pants.

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Along the way, I took some pictures out of sheer interest and because I found some things peculiar.  I’ll admit that I couldn’t take very many pictures because I had a supervisory role to take, but I did get a chance to take a few.  This was the one of the first ones I got to take in Charlestown on Bunker Hill Street at the corner of Monument of the United National Market.  I think the reason is obvious as to why I took the picture.

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Before we headed off to our next destination in the heart of Boston proper, we took a moment to stop by Bunker Hill.  It is an impressive monument where a picture doesn’t do it justice.

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On our way to Boston, we got to see a bunch of things in the window and the TD Garden was one of the them.  This was the closest I ever got to the arena.  Mind you, being a fan of the Montreal Canadiens, it was probably best that I was this far from it.  But, my students weren’t as reserved as I was.  They were carrying a Habs flag all around downtown Boston.  Luckily, no one was harmed.

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This was the next item of my wandering attention.  While the door was a warning, we never at any time felt unsafe in the city of Boston.  Say what you want about the recent events, our trip demonstrated that Boston is a safe place and a city to visit.

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Our next stop was the Boston Tea Party Museum.  This bench was situated nearby and I felt the need to take a picture of it.  It must be noted that telling students to move away from it wasn’t easy.

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The actual museum itself is a recent attraction and addition to the city of Boston.  At the start, you get this card which gives you your role for the visit.  Then, after attending a rousing town council meeting, you’re taken to the boat where you get to throw tea into the water.  Since the tea packages were tied to a rope, we got that chance to do it over and over again.  I also took the chance to note how the performer at the boat looked a lot like Peter Griffin of Family Guy fame.  We ended the visit with a nice stroll through the innovative museum and finally, with a visit to the gift shop where money was spent.

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At the beginning of our Boston Tea Party trek, feathers were given to us to mask our identities.  After we were done, one student thought it was fitting to adorn this statue with one of those feathers.  If you think that was rebellious, it was better than taunting the passing cars with a Habs flag.

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After we were done with the museum, we set off on foot to Quincy Market, not before making a few more Habs references in the streets.  Quincy Market is an expansive area in Boston and the perfect place to let 40 teenage students loose.  If only none of them came back, it would be perfect.  I’m only kidding, of course.  At this point, I was allowed to venture off to have my supper, which as you know, consisted of Burger 195 at Anthem.

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When the burger disappeared, I had about 30 minutes left to walk around and make sure that no damage was done to Quincy Market.  This was the moment where I saw our guide with a large ice cream cone.  I wasn’t going to have ice cream, but I quickly changed my mind when I saw just how much ice cream there was.

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120 Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Boston, Massachusetts

Subway:  State St.
Bus:  MBTA 4, 15, 39, 57, 92, 93, 325, 326

Visit:  May 23, 2013

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Located inside the central marketplace, which resembles a food court, you have to make sure you’re at one of the extremities to find this ice cream place.  So, as you resist the temptations of all those other various types of cuisine, you’ll eventually find the ice cream.

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The thing that I learned by looking at the ice cream cone that our guide had was the fact that it was expensive.  I wasn’t thrilled with that fact, but you only live once, I guess.  The choices that you have are vast and that’s a good thing.

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When I arrived, there was only one person working the counter.  At first, it looked like there was nobody there, so that gave me enough time to really think this through.  When it came time for things to proceed, the transaction was simple.  It was also interesting because there was a tip container collecting money for students, which I found rather interesting.

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Chocolate Ice Cream

There’s not much to say about a simple chocolate ice cream.  I was really happy that it was in see-through container that was large enough to make sure nothing was dripping out.  The chocolate ice cream, though expensive, was satisfying.

Sprinkles Ice Cream on Urbanspoon

Epilogue

With ice cream in hand, I set off to do what any good teacher would do in a moment like this, walk around an eat it.  Along the way, I didn’t see very many of our 40 students.  So, I took this time to look around and see the sights.

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What I did see was the Boston mindset and their stores that sell Christmas things in late spring.  I’ll let that one sink in a bit for those who are hoping for Christmas in July.  Luckily, when I arrived back to our meeting point, all of our students made it back on time without any major incidents.  We were off to our hotel and our last day in Boston.

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